Web
Analytics

D-Day heroes at 75th anniversary: ‘On behalf of the free world, thank you’

33

President Trump and the Queen pay tribute on the anniversary of Allied invasion of Europe to defeat evil, oppression, and totalitarianism. What was Macron doing there? The Vichy government allied with Hitler.

Quick note: Tech giants are shutting us down. You know this. Twitter, LinkedIn, Google Adsense, Pinterest permanently banned us. Facebook, Google search et al have shadow-banned, suspended and deleted us from your news feeds. They are disappearing us. But we are here. We will not waver. We will not tire. We will not falter, and we will not fail. Freedom will prevail.

Subscribe to Geller Report newsletter here — it’s free and it’s critical NOW when informed decision making and opinion is essential to America's survival. Share our posts on your social channels and with your email contacts. Fight the great fight.

Follow me on Gettr. I am there, click here. It's open and free.

Remember, YOU make the work possible. If you can, please contribute to Geller Report.

If you ever stand at the beach at Vierville-sur-Mer — otherwise known as Dog Green Sector, Omaha Beach, Normandy, France — that’s when you really, really get it. That’s when you first fully fathom the desperate courage born of sheer necessity and the fearsome carnage, the conjoined elements of the D-Day landings.

This is not some beach 50 yards deep with the promise of decent protection from strafing bullets once those 50 yards have been traversed. This is a wide, flat killing ground, more than 400 yards of open sand punctuated only by the shallowest protection of a lone shingle bank, itself still 200 yards from the still-only-partial cover of a steeper hillside. (Quin Hillyer)

 

It bears mentioning that another great counter offensive in the fight for freedom shares this day. On June 6, 2010, we launched movement to defeat the triumphal mosque and Groind Zero, a sixteen story mega-mosque on the site of a buikding destroyed in the 9/11 Islamic attacks on America. We held the first Ground Zero mosque protest. Ten thousand patriots converged on Ground Zero to protest the mega-mosque. We prevailed then, too.

They came from Washington state, California, Texas, Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Maine, South Carolina, Florida, and even Europe to stand against the most brutal and extreme ideology on the face of the earth.

Protest mosque

Ground Zero mosque protest, June 6, 2010, El Marco photo

‘On behalf of the free world, thank you’ The Queen pays tribute to D-Day heroes at 75th anniversary commemorations after veteran gets a standing ovation from Trump and world leaders for his moving speech

  • World leaders, royalty and hundreds of veterans honour those who fought in the D-Day landings 75 years ago 
  • The Queen, Theresa May, Donald Trump, Emmanuel Macron and Angela Merkel are in Portsmouth for events
  • Her Majesty used her speech to pay tribute to the ‘resilient wartime generation’ – she called ‘my generation’
  • Trump read excerpts of a prayer read to the nation by Franklin D. Roosevelt on the night of D-Day invasion
  • On June 5 1944, US General Dwight D. Eisenhower gave the final order to invade German-occupied France
  • Following day at dawn 156,000 men helped turn the war – 300 survivors are taking part in commemorations

The Queen today paid tribute to ‘my generation’ as she saluted D-Day heroes at a 75th anniversary event where a British veteran received a standing ovation from the monarch and Donald Trump.

More than 300 men who survived the invasion of France in 1944 were guests of honour and a group of veterans stood and saluted the thousands who made the ultimate sacrifice fighting Hitler’s Germany on Normandy’s beaches.

Theresa May, Emmanuel Macron, Angela Merkel and Justin Trudeau were among the politicians who gathered in Portsmouth today – exactly 75 years after US General Dwight D. Eisenhower, the Supreme Allied Commander in Europe, gave the final order to invade German-occupied France with the message: ‘The eyes of the world are upon you’.

Sergeant John Jenkins MBE, 99, who was born and raised in the Hampshire city, was in the Pioneer Corps on D-Day and landed on Gold Beach on June 8, and gave a moving, humble and funny speech that brought world leaders and royalty to their feet.

He said: ‘I was 23 years old when I landed on Gold Beach. I was terrified, I think everyone was. I  was just a small part in a very big machine. You never forget your comrades because we were all in it together’.

He added: ‘It is right that the courage and sacrifice of so many is being honoured 75 years on. We must never forget.’

Afterwards the Queen paid tribute to the ‘resilient wartime generation’ – she called ‘my generation’ – and said: ‘Seventy-five years ago, hundreds of thousands of young soldiers, sailors and airmen left these shores in the cause of freedom.

‘Many of them would never return, and the heroism, courage and sacrifice of those who lost their lives will never be forgotten. It is with humility and pleasure, on behalf of the entire country – indeed the whole free world – that I say to you all, thank you.

A flypast of Spitfires, Hurricanes and Red Arrows streaked across the sky at the end of the moving ceremony, where Prince Charles was seen wiping his eyes.

Afterwards Mr Trump met D-Day veterans with the Queen before the President said farewell and thanked her for his three-day state visit telling her: ‘It was a great honour to be with you’was heard saying: ‘Great woman. Great, great woman’. Her Majesty was heard saying back: ‘I hope you come to this country again’.

The Queen paid tribute to her 'wartime generation' in a speech to thousands in Portsmouth this afternoon and thanked them for their heroism

The Queen paid tribute to her ‘wartime generation’ in a speech to thousands in Portsmouth this afternoon and thanked them for their heroism

D-Day veteran John Jenkins' speech  described the fear of storming Normandy's beaches and the pain of losing his comrades

D-Day veteran John Jenkins’ speech  described the fear of storming Normandy’s beaches and the pain of losing his comrades

Mr Jenkins was 23 years old when he landed on Gold Beach in France and said his life changed forever after D-Day

Mr Jenkins was 23 years old when he landed on Gold Beach in France and said his life changed forever after D-Day

After posing for this farewell photo with the Queen at today's D-Day 75 commemoration in Portsmouth, Donald Trump thanked her for inviting him to Britain for a state visit

The President told the Queen: 'It was a great honour to be with you' and was heard saying: 'Great woman. Great, great woman'.

Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump met veterans at an event attended by the Allies who all took part in D-Day

Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump met veterans at an event attended by the Allies who all took part in D-Day

Heir to the throne Prince Charles shares a joke with a D-Day veteran, many of whom are now heading to Normandy for more events

An animated Theresa May, who is carrying out her last major event as Tory leader, speaks to veterans during a traditional afternoon tea

First Lady Melania Trump gets a kiss from President of France Emmanuel Macron after today's ceremony in Portsmouth

First Lady Melania Trump gets a kiss from President of France Emmanuel Macron after today’s ceremony in Portsmouth

The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, better known as the Red Arrows fly over Portsmouth this afternoon

Thousands watched in wonder as the Red Arrows carried out a flypast with their trademark red, white and blue plumes of smoke

Thousands watched in wonder as the Red Arrows carried out a flypast with their trademark red, white and blue plumes of smoke

A Spitfire (left) and Hurricane fly over the VIPs on an extraordinary day in Portsmouth marking the invasion of France in 1944

US Lockheed C-130 Hercules airplanes and Boeing-Bell V-22 Osprey aircraft fly over Carentan as part of D-Day commemorations

A Second World War veteran cries during the ceremony in Portsmouth this morning to mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day

A Second World War veteran cries during the ceremony in Portsmouth this morning to mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day

Queen thanks D-Day heroes for showing courage that helped free the world

Your Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen,

When I attended the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Landings, some thought it might be the last such event. But the wartime generation – my generation – is resilient, and I am delighted to be with you in Portsmouth today.

75 years ago, hundreds of thousands of young soldiers, sailors and airmen left these shores in the cause of freedom. In a broadcast to the nation at that time, my Father, King George VI, said: ‘…what is demanded from us all is something more than courage and endurance; we need a revival of spirit, a new unconquerable resolve…’ That is exactly what those brave men brought to the battle, as the fate of the world depended on their success.

Many of them would never return, and the heroism, courage and sacrifice of those who lost their lives will never be forgotten. It is with humility and pleasure, on behalf of the entire country – indeed the whole free world – that I say to you all, thank you.

The Queen, Mr Trump and Prince Charles met with six veterans following the ceremony.

In a small reception also attended by the First Lady, Donald Trump told the veterans of his honour to meet them.

Thomas Cuthbert, 93, said of the president: “He came across very well, he surprised me, he seemed one of the boys.”

Mr Trump sat next to the Queen and Prince Charles and they smiled and chatted surrounded by the leaders of all the Allied nations who took part in Operation Overlord – the codename for D-Day.

The President read excerpts of a prayer, broadcast across the United States by his predecessor Franklin D. Roosevelt on the night of the D-Day invasion, before French President Macron rose to thank those who fought to liberate his country from Hitler’s grip.

Mr Trump said: ‘Almighty God: Our sons, pride of our nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavour, a struggle to preserve our republic, our religion, and our civilisation, and to set free a suffering humanity.’

Afterwards Her Majesty, Prince Charles, the President and First Lady Melania met D-Day veterans and their families, many of whom will be heading back to Normandy this evening.

Tens of thousands of people also gathered at the Portsmouth Naval Memorial on Southsea Common for the event which marks the anniversary of the biggest amphibious invasion in military history.

75 years ago today – June 5 1944 – US General Dwight D. Eisenhower, the Supreme Allied Commander in Europe, gave the final order to invade German-occupied France with the message: ‘The eyes of the world are upon you’.

Mr Trump said today that Her Majesty was a hero to his British mother Mary,  and has called the Queen a 'truly great woman'

Prince Charles wipes his eyes during the moving ceremony where his mother paid tribute to the brave veterans who fought on D-Day in speech that also mentioned her father George VI

Prince Charles wipes his eyes during the moving ceremony where his mother paid tribute to the brave veterans who fought on D-Day in speech that also mentioned her father George VI

In a highly personal speech the Queen mentioned her father George VI  and paid tribute to the 'resilient wartime generation' - she called 'my generation' - thanking them for freeing the world

In a highly personal speech the Queen mentioned her father George VI  and paid tribute to the ‘resilient wartime generation’ – she called ‘my generation’ – thanking them for freeing the world

The Trumps were on the front row for the event attended by 14 world leaders and hundreds of veterans in Hampshire

The Trumps were on the front row for the event attended by 14 world leaders and hundreds of veterans in Hampshire

President Trump read an excerpt of Franklin D. Roosevelt's D-Day prayer, which he read to the nation on the night of June 6, 1944

President Trump read an excerpt of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s D-Day prayer, which he read to the nation on the night of June 6, 1944

The Trumps are on the third day of their state visit to Britain and will head to Ireland tonight and on to France tomorrow

The Trumps are on the third day of their state visit to Britain and will head to Ireland tonight and on to France tomorrow

Theresa May and Emmanuel Macron smile at Her Majesty as she takes her seat next to her son Prince Charles

Charles, the Queen and Donald Trump watch the D-Day flypast tearing across the Hampshire sky this afternoon

It is considered the turning point of the Second World War – but Operation Overlord also led to to the deaths of thousands on both sides, with tens of thousands more injured.

The President is on the third day of his state visit to Britain and is taking part in a ceremony on the south coast with the allies who helped defeat Hitler after a whirlwind 48 hours where he attended a glittering state banquet at Buckingham Palace and held talks in Downing Street.

Theresa May is making her final official appearances as the British Prime Minister during the D-Day commemorations which continue on Thursday across Normandy.

She read a letter from Captain Norman Skinner of the Royal Army Service Corps, to his wife Gladys on June 3, 1944.

The letter was in his pocket when he landed on Normandy’s Sword Beach on D-Day but he was killed the following day, leaving his wife and two young daughters.

Reading the letter Mrs May said: ‘My darling this is a very difficult letter for me to write. As you know something may happen at any moment and I cannot tell when you will receive this.

‘I had hoped to be able to see you during last weekend but it was impossible to get away and all the things I intended to say must be written. I’m sure that anyone with imagination must dislike the thought of what’s coming, but my fears will be more of being afraid than of what can happen to me.

‘You and I have had some lovely years which now seemed to have passed at lightning speed. My thoughts at this moment, in this lovely Saturday afternoon, are with you all now

Have a tip we should know? Your anonymity is NEVER compromised. Email tips@thegellerreport.com

The Truth Must be Told

Your contribution supports independent journalism

Please take a moment to consider this. Now, more than ever, people are reading Geller Report for news they won't get anywhere else. But advertising revenues have all but disappeared. Google Adsense is the online advertising monopoly and they have banned us. Social media giants like Facebook and Twitter have blocked and shadow-banned our accounts. But we won't put up a paywall. Because never has the free world needed independent journalism more.

Everyone who reads our reporting knows the Geller Report covers the news the media won't. We cannot do our ground-breaking report without your support. We must continue to report on the global jihad and the left's war on freedom. Our readers’ contributions make that possible.

Geller Report's independent, investigative journalism takes a lot of time, money and hard work to produce. But we do it because we believe our work is critical in the fight for freedom and because it is your fight, too.

Please contribute here.

or

Make a monthly commitment to support The Geller Report – choose the option that suits you best.

Pin It on Pinterest