News Ticker >
[ February 18, 2019 ]

Seven MPs quit the Labour Party over antisemitism

[ February 18, 2019 ]

Hitler-Lover Farrakhan Praises Omar for Anti-Semitic Language: ‘You Have Nothing to Apologize For’

[ February 18, 2019 ]

‘No Muslim Should Cooperate with the Police’

[ February 18, 2019 ]

Miraculous Israel will launch a spacecraft to the moon this week

[ February 18, 2019 ]

Canadian Muslim revealed to be notorious jihadi: ‘You’ll never kill the love for jihad’

[ February 18, 2019 ]

Democrat Pulls Gun On Man Wearing MAGA Hat, ‘It’s A Good Day For You To...

[ February 18, 2019 ]

British Muslima: Ariana Grande Pop Concert Bombing “Fair Retaliation”

[ February 18, 2019 ]

New York Times Blames Jews for 9/11

[ February 18, 2019 ]

Graham vows investigation into McCabe comments about DoJ discussions to remove Trump

[ February 18, 2019 ]

Hollywood Rallies Around Jew-Hater Ilhan Omar: ‘I’m a Jew; She Was Right About AIPAC’

Migrant Crisis in Italy Makes Half Citizens ‘Feel Like Strangers in Their Own Country’

63

Citizens in Italy say the migrant crisis that has come to their shores has left them with so many of differing backgrounds — of mostly Muslim background — that they don’t even feel like the country belongs to them any longer.

Specifically, Italians say their borders have been inundated with so many migrants that they feel like strangers in their own country.

Mass migration to Italy is becoming quite a problem for the citizens.

Look at this chart, which posed this notion as a statement: “I feel like a stranger in my own country.” The chart reveals the percentage who agree.

The question here was: “Do you feel like a stranger in your own country?” And you can see the results.

What a sad and sorry situation.

Breitbart tells more:

People across the West increasingly feel like they are “strangers” in their home countries, with Italy leading the pack.

Ipsos Mori research, cited by Chatham House fellow Matthew Goodwin, notes that some 49 per cent of Italians — who have borne the brunt of the migrant crisis recently — agree with the statement: “These days I feel like a stranger in my country.”

Since an expensive and not always entirely effective deal between the European Union and Turkey brought the so-called Eastern Mediterranean Route into Greece under some semblance of control, Italy found itself becoming ground zero for the migrant crisis.

Tens of thousands of boat-borne illegal migrants — transported by people-smugglers linked to terror groups and organised crime, aided and abetted by EU and EU member-state ships, as well as so-called “rescue” ships operated by Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) — began travelling to Italy.

Initial landfall is often made on islands such as Lampedusa and Sicily before onward travel to the mainland and northern Europe. The former is reportedly in a state of near collapse, while the latter has seen ultra-violent heroin and prostitution gangs taking an increasingly tight grip on its nightlife.

Research in September 2017 found that seven Italians in 10 think the country has too many migrants, while recent regional elections in Sicily saw eurosceptic-leaning, populist parties oust the establishment Democratic Party with a huge majority.

The U.S., which absorbed roughly 300,000 to 400,000 illegal migrants a year under the Barack Obama administration, according to Centre for Immigration Studies estimates, was not far behind Italy, with 45 per cent agreeing that they now feel like strangers.

Belgium, the seat of many of the European Union’s major institutions and power bases, was next on the list, at 44 per cent. The national capital of Brussels — which is often regarded as the capital of the European Union as well — is home to infamous Islamist enclave of Molenbeek, a popular bolthole for terrorists which often finds itself under something resembling military occupation.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the countries on the bottom of Goodwin’s list with the lowest number of people who feel like strangers in their homelands are Israel, on 20 per cent, and Japan, on 14 per cent.

Both maintain a robust sense of national identity, strong border controls, and are strict about who they admit and who meets their standards for naturalisation.

The Truth Must be Told

Your contribution supports independent journalism

Please take a moment to consider this. Now, more than ever, people are reading Geller Report for news they won't get anywhere else. But advertising revenues have all but disappeared. Google Adsense is the online advertising monopoly and they have banned us. Social media giants like Facebook and Twitter have blocked and shadow-banned our accounts. But we won't put up a paywall. Because never has the free world needed independent journalism more.

Everyone who reads our reporting knows the Geller Report covers the news the media won't. We cannot do our ground-breaking report without your support. We must continue to report on the global jihad and the left's war on freedom. Our readers’ contributions make that possible.

Geller Report's independent, investigative journalism takes a lot of time, money and hard work to produce. But we do it because we believe our work is critical in the fight for freedom and because it is your fight, too.

Please contribute to our ground-breaking work here.


Make a monthly commitment to support The Geller Report – choose the option that suits you best.

Contribute Monthly - Choose One

Have a tip we should know? Your anonymity is NEVER compromised. Email tips@thegellerreport.com

Pin It on Pinterest