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The origin of zero is NOT ISLAMIC: First evidence of the symbol is discovered in the Indian Bakhshali manuscript dating back to the 3rd century

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For years I have debunked the bogus claims of Islamic supremacists and their leftwing lapdogs in the media, cultural institutions, teachers, activists, etc. of claims of Muslim inventions. The origins of numerous scientific, medical and technical inventions claimed by Muslims were actually stolen from conquered peoples by Muslim invaders. The zero has long been one of those claims. Wrong. History has been scrubbed and manufactured Muslim myths are presented as fact.

Read: “1001 Muslim Myths and Historical Revisions” Breitbart 

“1001 Pieces of Islamist Propaganda: Fabricated Exhibit Comes to D.C.” PJ Media

It has long been one of the world’s greatest mathematical mysteries, but experts believe they have finally cracked the origin of the zero symbol. Scientists have discovered evidence of the symbol in the Indian Bakhshali manuscript – a mathematical text discovered in 1881

The origin of zero: First evidence of the symbol is discovered in the Indian Bakhshali manuscript dating back to the 3rd century

  • The Bakhshali manuscript was found in 1881 but has never been dated
  • Researchers used radiocarbon dating and found that it dates to the 3rd century
  • It contains a dot symbol throughout, which was develop into the zero symbol in the sixth century
  • It has long been one of the world’s greatest mathematical mysteries, but experts believe they have finally cracked the origin of the zero symbol.
  • Scientists have discovered evidence of the symbol in the Indian Bakhshali manuscript – a mathematical text discovered in 1881.
  • Carbon dating indicates that the manuscript dates from as early as the 3rd century, making it the world’s oldest recorded origin of the zero symbol that we use today.

By Shivali Best For Mailonline, 14 September 2017:

It has long been one of the world’s greatest mathematical mysteries, but experts believe they have finally cracked the origin of the zero symbol.

Scientists have discovered evidence of the symbol in the Indian Bakhshali manuscript – a mathematical text discovered in 1881.

Carbon dating indicates that the manuscript dates from as early as the 3rd century, making it the world’s oldest recorded origin of the zero symbol that we use today.

Researchers from the University of Oxford conducted the first ever radiocarbon dating on the Bakhshali manuscript and revealed that it dates from as early as the 3rd century – five centuries older than previously believed.

This means that the manuscript predates a 9th-century inscription of zero on the wall of a temple in Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh, which was thought to be the oldest example of a zero.

Professor Marcus du Sautoy, who led the study, said: ‘Today we take it for granted that the concept of zero is used across the globe and is a key building block of the digital world.

‘But the creation of zero as a number in its own right, which evolved from the placeholder dot symbol found in the Bakhshali manuscript, was one of the greatest breakthroughs in the history of mathematics.

We now know that it was as early as the 3rd century that mathematicians in India planted the seed of the idea that would later become so fundamental to the modern world.

‘The findings show how vibrant mathematics have been in the Indian sub-continent for centuries.’

The zero symbol that we use today evolved from a dot that can be seen throughout the Bakhshali manuscript.

The zero symbol that we use today evolved from a dot that can be seen throughout the Bakhshali manuscript

The zero symbol that we use today evolved from a dot that can be seen throughout the Bakhshali manuscript

THE BAKHSHALI MANUSCRIPT

The Bakhshali manuscript was found in 1881 by a local farmer.

The manuscript was buried in a field in a village called Bakhshali, near Peshawar, in what is now a region of Pakistan.

Since 1902, it has been housed in the Bodley Library at the University of Oxford.

But it will go on public display at the Science Museum in London as a centrepiece of the major exhibition Illuminating India: 5000 Years of Science and Innovation, opening 4 October 2017.

Rather than being used on its own, the dot was used as a ‘placeholder’ to indicate orders of magnitude in a number system – for example, the zero denoting a lack of tens in 101.

While the use of zero as a placeholder was seen in several different ancient cultures, including the Mayans, the researchers say the symbol in the Bakhshali manuscript it significant for two reasons.

Firstly, this dot evolved to have a hollow centre that we see in the zero symbol today.

And secondly, it was only in India that this zero developed into a number in its own right, when Brahmagupta, an Indian astronomer, wrote a text called Brahmasphutasiddhanta in the sixth century, which is the first document to discuss zero as a number.

Previous studies have suggested that Bakhshali manuscript dates from between the 8th and 12th century, based on the style of writing.

But the new carbon dating reveals that the manuscript, which consists of 70 fragile leaves of birch bark, is composed of material from at least three different periods.

Richard Ovenden, librarian at the Bodley Library, which houses the manuscript, said: ‘Determining the date of the Bakhshali manuscript is of vital importance to the history of mathematics and the study of early South Asian culture and these surprising research results testify to the subcontinent’s rich and longstanding scientific tradition.’

The Bakhshali manuscript will go on public display at the Science Museum in London as part of the exhibition Illuminating India: 5000 Years of Science and Innovation, opening 4 October 2017.

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