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#myjihad in Spain: Adoption Jihad

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Adoption Jihad: Want to Adopt A Child? Convert to Islam Atlas Shrugs, May 2011

Spain has just agreed to amend its adoption code for children
born to Muslim parents. Islam doesn't follow the Western tradition of
adoption, in which the adoptive parents have total control of the child and
how he/she is raised once the adoption is finalized. Instead, Islamic
adoption is essentially a form of legal guardianship. The courts are
supposed to monitor that the child is being raised correctly as a
Muslim.  France has already amended its adoption laws to accommodate
Muslim-born children. I would not be surprised to see the rest of
Europe follow this path to Sharia through the backdoor. I pray that the USA
won't change our laws. If it stops adoption from certain countries,
then those countries should take their own orphans. Yes, a foreign
adoption is probably in the child's best interest, but only if it is done
under current laws. We don't need to Shariaize our adoptions laws. (thanks to Danielle)

Instead of helping these children escape the most brutal, extreme and misogynistic ideology on the planet, Western governments are forcing the adoptive parents to convert to Islam. Sick.

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The Islamization of Spanish Jurisprudence Gatestone Institute

Spain Submits to "Adoption Jihad"

To the extent that European
lawmakers are willing to graft Islamic legal principles onto Europe's
secular legal codes, Islamic Sharia law could easily become a permanent
reality in Spain and across the continent.

Spain has acceded to the demands of the Islamist government in
Morocco by agreeing that Moroccan children adopted by Spanish families
must remain culturally and religiously Muslim.

The agreement obliges the Spanish government to establish a "control
mechanism" that would enable Moroccan religious authorities to monitor
the children until they reach the age of 18 to ensure they have not
converted to Christianity.

The requirement, which will be enshrined in Spain's legal code,
represents an unprecedented encroachment of Islamic Sharia law within
Spanish jurisprudence.
The move also represents a frontal assault on the
freedom of religion or belief, which is protected by Article 16 of the Spanish Constitution.

Spanish Justice Minister Alberto Ruiz-Gallardón said on February 17
that he had agreed to the demands of his Moroccan counterpart, the
Islamist Mustafa Ramid, so that Spanish families who have been assigned Moroccan orphans can bring the children to Spain.

Adopting children in Morocco has always been problematic. But the
procedure became vastly more complicated in 2012, when Morocco's newly
elected Islamist government announced measures to prevent non-Muslim
foreigners from adopting Moroccan children.

According to the Casablanca-based NGO Feminine Solidarity Association
(ASF), Morocco has an alarmingly high rate of child abandonment; an
average of 24 children are abandoned every day (or around 8,700 every
year) throughout the country
. (ASF says many children are abandoned
because of Article 490 of the Moroccan Penal Code, which stipulates one
year in prison for anyone found guilty of having sexual relations
outside of marriage.)

Statistically, the future for Moroccan orphans is bleak. A consortium of six NGOs reports
that 80% of the children who grow up in Moroccan orphanages become
delinquents, and 10% end up committing suicide. Only 10% become
productive members of society.

Because of its geographic proximity, Spain has emerged as a key
destination for Moroccan orphans. In 2011, the year before the Islamist
government intervened to freeze the adoption process, 254 Moroccan
children were assigned to Spanish families.

The Western concept of adoption — by which an adopted child becomes
the true child of the adoptive parents — has never existed in Morocco
(nor in most other Muslim countries).

Instead, Islamic law governs adoption through a system called "Kafala,"
a legal guardianship which allows a non-Muslim person to assume
responsibility for the protection, education and maintenance of an
abandoned child, but which prohibits a non-Muslim from formally adopting
or assuming custody of that child.

According to Kafala, the "adopted" child must keep the name and
surname of his biological parents. Moreover, the child must remain
Muslim and must maintain the nationality of his or her birth. In effect,
non-Muslim guardians are prohibited from establishing a full parental
relationship with the child, as would be the case with adoption.

On September 19, 2012, Moroccan Justice Minister Mustafa Ramid issued a circular
prohibiting the transfer of Moroccan children to foreigners "if they
are not habitually resident in Morocco." He argued that once children
leave the country, it is impossible to verify whether the Kafala is
being respected and the children are being raised as Muslims.

The new stipulation affects at least 58 Spanish families who were
assigned Moroccan children before the Islamist government took office in
November 2011.

In order to comply with the new requirements, some Spaniards have
quit their jobs and/or sold their homes and moved to Morocco to obtain
residency there. But many have discovered that the mere possession of a
Moroccan residence permit does not guarantee that non-Muslim adoptive
parents can someday take their children to Spain.

Susana Ramos, for example, an adoptive parent from Madrid, was assigned an abandoned baby more than one year ago by the Moroccan League for Child Welfare,
a public institution in charge of orphans. Since then, she has made 23
trips to Morocco, but still has been unable to take the child to Spain.

In at least a dozen other cases, Spaniards have converted to Islam in order to obtain custody over "their" children, especially if they are girls.

Seeking to end the "humanitarian drama," Spanish Justice Minister
Alberto Ruiz-Gallardón announced that he would give in to Moroccan
demands and amend Spain's Law Concerning International Adoption, dated December 2007, in order to bring Spanish law into conformity with Islamic law.

The legal changes, which are set to take effect in 2013, would
"constrain" the rights of Spanish adoptive parents by obligating them to
fully comply with the Kafala until the children reach adulthood.

In practical terms, this means that Spaniards who adopt Moroccan
children would forfeit their right to use the Spanish court system to
try to obtain "full adoption" of the child under Spanish law. In the
past, some Spanish families have successfully used this legal route "to
ensure the well-being" of their adopted Moroccan children, by gaining
for them the same rights as Spanish children.

Read the rest.

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