News Ticker >
[ March 29, 2020 ]

President Trump RIPS CNN Smearer: “CNN is fake news”

[ March 29, 2020 ]

President Trump is extending coronavirus shut down until April 30th

[ March 29, 2020 ]

WATCH LIVE: President Trump and White House Coronavirus Task Force hold briefing 5:45 PM Eastern

[ March 29, 2020 ]

Queen Of Delay Pelosi Tells CNN, President Trump ‘Fiddles…While People Are Dying’

[ March 29, 2020 ]

French Expert: Second Study Shows Hydroxychloroquine Helps Fight Coronavirus

[ March 29, 2020 ]

Ex-CIA Analyst Exposes CNN’s Anti-Trump ‘Fact Check’ as Literal Fake News

[ March 29, 2020 ]

DISGUSTING: NBC’s Chuck Todd to Joe Biden: ‘Do You Think There Is Blood on the...

[ March 29, 2020 ]

Egypt: Survey shows that women approve of female genital mutilation more than men do

[ March 29, 2020 ]

FLA Gov. DeSantis: Shipments of drug hydroxychloroquine to help COVID-19 on way to Florida

[ March 29, 2020 ]

Trump eyes massive expulsion of Chinese spies

Saturday Night Cinema: The Umbrėlląs of Chėrbọurg (1964)

6

 

Screen Shot 2012-02-11 at 6.55.20 PM

"Delicately bittersweet." Tonight's Saturday Night Cinema is the French confection, The Umbrellas of Cherbourg. Sugary sweet, beautifully done, it is a strange and delightful French musical. And the then-20-year-old Catherine Deneuve is strikingly beautiful.

A completely sung movie, The Umbrellas of Cherbourg is closest in form to a cinematic opera. Composer Michel Legrand composed the score, modeling it around the patterns of everyday conversation. Umbrellas was re-released in 1997. ~ Jason Ankeny, Rovi

A number of different factors raise this absurdly simple scenario to the level of highest excellence, but the chief among them is surely Michel Legrand's iconic score.

Jacques Demy's 1964 masterpiece is a pop-art opera, or, to borrow the director's own description, a film in song. This simple romantic tragedy begins in 1957. Guy Foucher (Nino Castelnuovo), a 20-year-old French auto mechanic, has fallen in love with 17-year-old Geneviève Emery (a luminous Catherine Deneuve), an employee in her widowed mother's chic but financially embattled umbrella shop. 

Awards

  •     Prix Louis-Delluc, 1963
  •     Palme d'Or at the 1964 Cannes Film Festival[4]
  •     Critics' prize for Best Film, by the French Syndicate of Film Critics, 1965
  •     Nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film at the 37th Academy Awards held in 1965[5]
  •     Nominated for four more Academy Awards at the 38th Academy Awards held in 1966, three for Legrand and Demy, though it did not win any: "Best Song" (for "I Will Wait For You"), "Best Original Score", "Best Scoring – Adaptation or Treatment" and "Best Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen".[6]

The Truth Must be Told

Your contribution supports independent journalism

Please take a moment to consider this. Now, more than ever, people are reading Geller Report for news they won't get anywhere else. But advertising revenues have all but disappeared. Google Adsense is the online advertising monopoly and they have banned us. Social media giants like Facebook and Twitter have blocked and shadow-banned our accounts. But we won't put up a paywall. Because never has the free world needed independent journalism more.

Everyone who reads our reporting knows the Geller Report covers the news the media won't. We cannot do our ground-breaking report without your support. We must continue to report on the global jihad and the left's war on freedom. Our readers’ contributions make that possible.

Geller Report's independent, investigative journalism takes a lot of time, money and hard work to produce. But we do it because we believe our work is critical in the fight for freedom and because it is your fight, too.

Please contribute to our ground-breaking work here.


Make a monthly commitment to support The Geller Report – choose the option that suits you best.

Contribute Monthly - Choose One

Have a tip we should know? Your anonymity is NEVER compromised. Email tips@thegellerreport.com

Pin It on Pinterest