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The Balkans Piece Pajamas Media wouldn’t run: America’s Tangled Kosovo Web

What follows is a Balkans piece that Julia Gorin penned for Pajamas Media that was scheduled to run tomorrow but was ….. killed. What is up with PJM anyway? What are they? What is their mission? All that  money and resources for what? Another timid, left leaning website. Yawn…. pity, because there are a number of good people over there who have sold out to the almighty dollar.

Here Gorin reacts to the PJM cancellation:

From: xxxxxxpajamasmedia.com
Sent:
Tuesday, October 20, 2009 1:00 PM
To: Julia Gorin
Subject: RE: so I'm
still staying tuned….

Hello,

Piece is scheduled to run
tomorrow.

Kindest Regards,
xxxxxxxx

FOLLOWED BY:

Hello,

A couple editors more aware of
the topic than myself have looked at the piece today, and don't think it is
right for us. I apologize for the long wait and the previous acceptance, but it
looks like we are going to pass.

Kindest Regards,

xxxxxxx
PJM xxxxx

And  so Julia wrote him back:

Yeah, that's the usual pattern when it comes to the Balkans. I get an email from
an editor accepting a solidly researched piece, then I know to scroll down a few
more emails to find the one where someone has talked him or her out of it.


And so the truth of Kosovo (like that of Bosnia and Croatia) stays
unexposed, and our bureaucrats continue operating in the shadows. It's something
they've come to rely on in the region, knowing the public has no clue that we
work with "allies" there who not only double-deal with Islamists, but keep us
"on course" through the threat of violence. It's the blackmail of America that
no one knows about (aside from the internationals working there). And so our
position has come to mirror the Albanian one. Meanwhile, the American flag waves
in Kosovo. It's a very twisted situation. As for the bigger journalists who
could expose it, they've got Pulitzers to protect, won based on the official
fabrications–and so the narrative must remain as is.

Sorry if I sound a
bit dramatic (and cryptic); it's actually an understated tone against the
backdrop of what America has gotten herself into there. Sadly, it's a situation
that was originally all driven by a handful of Clinton holdovers, but is now
official U.S. policy–irrespective of presidential administration.

Just
so you know: When you encounter people who are, as you say, "more aware of the
topic" than you, that generally means they've been more thoroughly
propagandized. This is usually–but not always–why they're resistant to such a
piece. I get this every week, from every publication (except American Legion
Magazine and WorldNetDaily), regardless of an editor's political leanings.

 I hope I haven't alienated you. Am just exhausted by painful predictability and by
the futility of trying to sound the warning bell.

Best,
Julia

All I can say is thank G-d for Julia Gorin. She is relentless in the pursuit of the truth in the Balkans. And shame on Pajamas; they will continue in their pursuit of the irrelevant to which they have rendered themselves.

America’s
Tangled Kosovo Web
by Julia Gorin

Re-reading a 2007 Der Spiegel article recently, I came across some information about the
brother of indicted war criminal and U.S. buddy Ramush Haradinaj. Daut Haradinaj
was speaking at an event honoring a dead Albanian poet-nationalist after serving
a prison sentence for manslaughter.

According to the article, many saw his appearance at the ceremony “as a sign
of his willingness to fill the breach if his brother Ramush is sentenced at his
upcoming trial in The Hague.”

As we know, some heavy U.S. and UN pressure (and evidence-tampering) later — and a few dead witnesses later — Ramush Haradinaj was acquitted because of
“insufficient evidence.”

Haradinaj picked up his political career where he left off, with the blessing
of the U.S. and UNMIK (UN Mission in Kosovo), and so Daut didn’t need to step
in, but at least we know our pal Ramush has an equally competent and murderous
brother who would have been encouraged to pursue politics had things turned out
differently. Indeed, according to the article, the Haradinaj clan has more than
just two such winners:

According to the indictment, Ramush Haradinaj, a.k.a. “Smajl”, was accused of
37 counts of crimes against humanity, including murder, kidnapping and torture,
during the Kosovo war in 1998.

The indictment also stated that his brothers, Daut, Frasher and Shkelzen,
were among the members of the “criminal organization” headed by Haradinaj, and
that the family home in Glodjane was periodically used as a command
center to plan and commit the crimes. Thirty-two corpses of Serbs, gypsies and
Albanians, some severely mutilated, were found near the farm.
So far
Haradinaj has denied all accusations.

Sören Jessen-Petersen, the former UN administrator, long viewed the presumed
war criminal as a “close partner and friend” who “sacrificed and contributed so
much to a better future for Kosovo.”

By 2005, that Haradinaj homestead lined with mutilated bodies served as “a
banquet hall where [high-ranking UN and NATO representatives] could meet with
Haradinaj to discuss bringing peace to the region.”

I’ll get back to Daut Haradinaj in a moment, but just to complete the picture
about this great friend of the U.S., Ramush Haradinaj:

A report by the UN police force in Kosovo has linked Haradinaj to the cocaine
trade. And according to a 2005 analysis by Germany’s foreign intelligence
service, the Bundesnachrichtendienst (BND), Haradinaj and his associates play a
key role in “a broad spectrum of criminal, political and military activities
that significantly affect the security situation throughout Kosovo. The group,
which counts about 100 members, is involved in drug and weapons smuggling, as
well as illegal trading in dutiable items.”

If the BND analysis is correct, Haradinaj has apparently made himself a major
player in one of Kosovo’s key industries. According to experts, the €700 million
budget of this province, 90 percent of which is populated by ethnic Albanians,
pales in comparison to the revenues earned in the drug trade in
Kosovo.

As if this weren’t messy enough as regards Ramush, who is welcomed to our
shores by our leaders with open arms, let’s go back to that ceremony at which
Daut spoke:

When the event ends [Daut] Haradinaj jumps into a waiting car in front of the
center and is taken to a secret restaurant. At the restaurant, Besiana-F, he
meets Ali Ahmeti, the leader of the 2001 Albanian uprising in Macedonia. Ahmeti and
his equally famous uncle, Fazli Veliuboth of whom are on a US terrorism watch
list and have been banned from entering the United States since May 2003
— have crossed the border into Kosovo to join in the day’s celebration.
[There is no longer any effective border between Kosovo and Macedonia.]

Upon leaving the restaurant Ahmeti and Haradinaj embrace briefly. Then they
climb into SUVs with darkened windows.

So what we have is our good friends the Haradinaj Family naturally being in
close ties with folks who are on our terrorism watch list. While Ahmeti and
Veliu aren’t doing anything in Macedonia that the Haradinaj clan didn’t do in
Kosovo — indeed, Ahmeti is the leader of a governing political party in
Macedonia — the former two randomly ended up as “terrorists” just as Haradinaj
randomly ended up as a “peace partner.”

The difference between them? Once the Albanians expanded their war into
Macedonia, we figured out what their game was, and while the Albanians knew that
Kosovo was just one leg of the war for Greater Albania, we had only signed on
for Kosovo. Realizing our mistake but unable to undo it, we’ve been keeping up
the charade and continuing to term the Kosovo-Albanian terrorists our “allies,”
while trying to figure out how to discourage their allies in
Macedonia.

Over time, we’ve been given a better “understanding” of our agenda in the
region, and therefore eventually started facilitating Albanian terror in Macedonia. After all, if we
want to keep the Haradinajs as “friends” in Kosovo, eventually we’re going to
have to make friends with their friends in Macedonia. Otherwise, try navigating
around this one: “Throughout the fighting,” Chris Deliso writes in his book The Coming Balkan Caliphate, “jihadis were also penetrating
Macedonia from the other, western front in Tetovo and reportedly had connections
with Kosovo Albanian officials such as Daut Haradinaj, chief of general staff of
the Kosovo Protection Corps (KPC)…according to other Macedonian military
sources.”

Turns out, our pal Ramush’s own brother is on our blacklist as well. He
reportedly met in August 2001 — just two months after we rescued 400
Albanian terrorists from Macedonian security forces — with Ayman al-Zawahiri’s
brother Muhammad. According to the Serbian daily Blic, a “number of
intelligence services know about this. There is proof that Daut Haradinaj took
part in the clashes with Macedonian security services, because of which he was
put on the U.S. terrorist blacklist and thrown out of the Kosovo Protection
Corps.”

This reminds us that Albanians walk their own tightrope, in their equally
contradictory dealings with us. They are constantly torn between — and always
playing — their two key allies, which are each other’s mortal enemies:
Washington/London/Brussels vs. the Saudis and bin Laden himself (who helped
train and arm the KLA while we did the same).

How to serve and shower love on both, without offending the other? That is
the Albanian dilemma.

Of course, even if the Albanians paraded their al-Qaeda connections,
would anyone in the mainstream establishment — the same one that repeated their
lies and came up with their own to justify the “liberation” and “independence” —
actually call them on it? Somehow I doubt it.

To further illustrate the randomness of which Albanians we term “allies” and
which ones “terrorists,” let’s take the last name Thaci. If it’s Thaci of
Kosovo, it gets a warm welcome in the U.S., since it’s probably our friend,
“prime minister” Hashim Thaci. However, if it’s Thaci from Macedonia, it’s
probably Mendux (or Menduh) Thaci, the leader of the main opposition Albanian
party but for some reason on the U.S. blacklist.

It's riveting. Read the whole thing here.

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